It's Nadia, just Nadia

3 simple things:

Juice boxes are the best invention ever

I have a newfound love for musical instruments

This descibes what keeps me optimistic about life:
"Hope is the thing with feathers
that perches in the soul
and sings the tune without the words
and never stops at all..."


Reblogged from constellationofhope
Reblogged from merosezah

merosezah:

The Hajj and Eid al-Adha

1. Muslim pilgrims pray in a circle around the Kaaba inside the Grand mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia,for the annual Hajj. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

2.Muslim pilgrims perform the “Tawaf” ritual around the Kaaba at Mecca’s Grand Mosque before leaving the holy Saudi city at the end of the annual Hajj pilgrimage. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

3. A Muslim pilgrim prays as visits the Hiraa cave at the top of Noor Mountain on the outskirts of Mecca, Saudi Arabia. (Hassan Ammar/AP)

4. Thai Muslim pilgrims offer prayers before they depart for the annual Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca at the Hat Yai International airport in southern Thailand. (Muhammad Sabri/AFP/Getty Images)
5.Hajj pilgrims cry as they prepare to depart for Mecca from the Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, Nepal. (Navesh Chitrakar/Reuters)

6.A man carries a sacrificial goat on sale at a market, ahead of the Eid al-Adha feast, in Sanaa, Yemen.(Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters)

7. Imran 11, makes traditional sweets at a market ahead of the upcoming Eid al-Adha, or the Feast of the Sacrifice in Jalalabad east of Kabul, Afghanistan. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

8. Girls attend prayers marking the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha in Abuja, Nigeria.(Afolabi Sotunde/Reuters)
9. Boys lead rams out of the Atlantic Ocean after washing them at first light in preparation for sacrifice, on Eid al-Adha, in Dakar, Senegal. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
10. Iraqis visit and pray at the gravesides of relatives in Baghdad during Eid AL-Adha.( Khalil Al-Murshidi/AFP/Getty Image)

(Source: merosezah, via luminousabeer)

Reblogged from johnlockbxtch
  • Isaac: Augustus Waters was a self-aggrandizing bastard. But we forgive him. We forgive him not because he had a heart as figuratively good as his literal one sucked, or because he knew more about how to hold a cigarette than any nonsmoker in history, or because he got eighteen years when he should've gotten more.
  • Augustus Waters: Seventeen.
  • Isaac: I'm assuming you've got some time, you interrupting bastard.
  • Isaac: I'm telling you, Augustus Waters talked so much that he'd interrupt you at his own funeral. And he was pretentious: Sweet Jesus Christ, that kid never took a piss without pondering the abundant metaphorical resonances of human waste production. And he was vain: I do not believe I have ever met a more physically attractive person who was more acutely aware of his own physical attractiveness.
  • Issac: But I will say this: When the scientists of the future show up at my house with robot eyes and they tell me to try them on, I will tell the scientists to screw off, because I do not want to see a world without him.
Reblogged from womenwhokickass
womenwhokickass:

Merhezia Labidi-Maiza: Why she kicks ass
She is the official translator (Arabic-French) of the International Union of Islamic Scholars and a member of the European Council of Religious Leaders. She is also a coordinator of Women of Faith Global Network (WFGN), co-president of Religions for Peace (RfP), a co-author of school manuals on religious education in multicultural societies, and a lecturer on Islamic topics.  
She graduated from Tunis High College for Teachers with a degree in English Language and Literature in 1986. In 1991, she received a post-graduate diploma of DEA in English literature from La Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris.
 In 1996, Ms. Labidi-Maiza received a post-graduate diploma of specialized studies of translation at La Sorbonne. She teaches translation of religious texts at the European Institute for Humanities, France’s first academy of Islamic theology. 
In 2011 she was elected as representative of Tunisians living in France in the National Founding Assembly of Tunisia, as a member of the Ennahdha Party. She was elected vice chair of the assembly.

womenwhokickass:

Merhezia Labidi-Maiza: Why she kicks ass

  • She is the official translator (Arabic-French) of the International Union of Islamic Scholars and a member of the European Council of Religious Leaders. She is also a coordinator of Women of Faith Global Network (WFGN), co-president of Religions for Peace (RfP), a co-author of school manuals on religious education in multicultural societies, and a lecturer on Islamic topics.  
  • She graduated from Tunis High College for Teachers with a degree in English Language and Literature in 1986. In 1991, she received a post-graduate diploma of DEA in English literature from La Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris.
  • In 1996, Ms. Labidi-Maiza received a post-graduate diploma of specialized studies of translation at La Sorbonne. She teaches translation of religious texts at the European Institute for Humanities, France’s first academy of Islamic theology. 
  • In 2011 she was elected as representative of Tunisians living in France in the National Founding Assembly of Tunisia, as a member of the Ennahdha Party. She was elected vice chair of the assembly.

(via starsandwords)

Reblogged from queeniman
Reblogged from portraitsofboston
portraitsofboston:

"I am from Iraq. I left in 1990. Now I work with Iraqi refugees. I think that in a lot of ways things in Iraq are getting worse. It’s much more dangerous to live there, bombs are exploding everywhere, women are much more oppressed, the hijab is almost mandatory, boys and girls are being separated even starting in elementary school…It’s mostly due to a narrow and incorrect interpretation of religion and the Quran….
My mom was a very strong and independent woman. Her parents had arranged for her to marry someone, and they didn’t want her to go to college, but she got on the train and escaped to Baghdad. She chose her husband and got a master’s degree.”

portraitsofboston:

"I am from Iraq. I left in 1990. Now I work with Iraqi refugees. I think that in a lot of ways things in Iraq are getting worse. It’s much more dangerous to live there, bombs are exploding everywhere, women are much more oppressed, the hijab is almost mandatory, boys and girls are being separated even starting in elementary school…It’s mostly due to a narrow and incorrect interpretation of religion and the Quran….

My mom was a very strong and independent woman. Her parents had arranged for her to marry someone, and they didn’t want her to go to college, but she got on the train and escaped to Baghdad. She chose her husband and got a master’s degree.”

(via starsandwords)

Reblogged from girlthrualookingglass
s4br:

girlthrualookingglass:

Julio Diaz has a daily routine. Every night, the 31-year-old social worker ends his hour-long subway commute to the Bronx one stop early, just so he can eat at his favorite diner.
But one night last month, as Diaz stepped off the No. 6 train and onto a nearly empty platform, his evening took an unexpected turn.
He was walking toward the stairs when a teenage boy approached and pulled out a knife.
"He wants my money, so I just gave him my wallet and told him, ‘Here you go,’" Diaz says.
As the teen began to walk away, Diaz told him, “Hey, wait a minute. You forgot something. If you’re going to be robbing people for the rest of the night, you might as well take my coat to keep you warm.”
The would-be robber looked at his would-be victim, “like what’s going on here?” Diaz says. “He asked me, ‘Why are you doing this?’”
Diaz replied: “If you’re willing to risk your freedom for a few dollars, then I guess you must really need the money. I mean, all I wanted to do was get dinner and if you really want to join me … hey, you’re more than welcome.
"You know, I just felt maybe he really needs help," Diaz says.
Diaz says he and the teen went into the diner and sat in a booth.
"The manager comes by, the dishwashers come by, the waiters come by to say hi," Diaz says. “The kid was like, ‘You know everybody here. Do you own this place?’"
"No, I just eat here a lot," Diaz says he told the teen. “He says, ‘But you’re even nice to the dishwasher.’"
Diaz replied, “Well, haven’t you been taught you should be nice to everybody?”
"Yea, but I didn’t think people actually behaved that way," the teen said.
Diaz asked him what he wanted out of life. “He just had almost a sad face,” Diaz says.
The teen couldn’t answer Diaz — or he didn’t want to.
When the bill arrived, Diaz told the teen, “Look, I guess you’re going to have to pay for this bill ‘cause you have my money and I can’t pay for this. So if you give me my wallet back, I’ll gladly treat you.”
The teen “didn’t even think about it” and returned the wallet, Diaz says. “I gave him $20 … I figure maybe it’ll help him. I don’t know.”
Diaz says he asked for something in return — the teen’s knife — “and he gave it to me.”
Afterward, when Diaz told his mother what happened, she said, “You’re the type of kid that if someone asked you for the time, you gave them your watch.”
"I figure, you know, if you treat people right, you can only hope that they treat you right. It’s as simple as it gets in this complicated world."

Amazing

s4br:

girlthrualookingglass:

Julio Diaz has a daily routine. Every night, the 31-year-old social worker ends his hour-long subway commute to the Bronx one stop early, just so he can eat at his favorite diner.

But one night last month, as Diaz stepped off the No. 6 train and onto a nearly empty platform, his evening took an unexpected turn.

He was walking toward the stairs when a teenage boy approached and pulled out a knife.

"He wants my money, so I just gave him my wallet and told him, ‘Here you go,’" Diaz says.

As the teen began to walk away, Diaz told him, “Hey, wait a minute. You forgot something. If you’re going to be robbing people for the rest of the night, you might as well take my coat to keep you warm.”

The would-be robber looked at his would-be victim, “like what’s going on here?” Diaz says. “He asked me, ‘Why are you doing this?’”

Diaz replied: “If you’re willing to risk your freedom for a few dollars, then I guess you must really need the money. I mean, all I wanted to do was get dinner and if you really want to join me … hey, you’re more than welcome.

"You know, I just felt maybe he really needs help," Diaz says.

Diaz says he and the teen went into the diner and sat in a booth.

"The manager comes by, the dishwashers come by, the waiters come by to say hi," Diaz says. “The kid was like, ‘You know everybody here. Do you own this place?’"

"No, I just eat here a lot," Diaz says he told the teen. “He says, ‘But you’re even nice to the dishwasher.’"

Diaz replied, “Well, haven’t you been taught you should be nice to everybody?”

"Yea, but I didn’t think people actually behaved that way," the teen said.

Diaz asked him what he wanted out of life. “He just had almost a sad face,” Diaz says.

The teen couldn’t answer Diaz — or he didn’t want to.

When the bill arrived, Diaz told the teen, “Look, I guess you’re going to have to pay for this bill ‘cause you have my money and I can’t pay for this. So if you give me my wallet back, I’ll gladly treat you.”

The teen “didn’t even think about it” and returned the wallet, Diaz says. “I gave him $20 … I figure maybe it’ll help him. I don’t know.”

Diaz says he asked for something in return — the teen’s knife — “and he gave it to me.”

Afterward, when Diaz told his mother what happened, she said, “You’re the type of kid that if someone asked you for the time, you gave them your watch.”

"I figure, you know, if you treat people right, you can only hope that they treat you right. It’s as simple as it gets in this complicated world."

Amazing

(via starsandwords)

If your dreams don’t scare you, they’re not big enough…

Reblogged from aatombomb
We were discussing homosexuality because of an allusion to it in the book we were reading, and several boys made comments such as, “That’s disgusting.” We got into the debate and eventually a boy admitted that he was terrified/disgusted when he was once sharing a taxi and the other male passenger made a pass at him. The lightbulb went off. “Oh,” I said. “I get it. See, you are afraid, because for the first time in your life you have found yourself a victim of unwanted sexual advances by someone who has the physical ability to use force against you.” The boy nodded and shuddered visibly.“But,” I continued. “As a woman, you learn to live with that from the time you are fourteen, and it never stops. We live with that fear every day of our lives. Every man walking through the parking garage the same time you are is either just a harmless stranger or a potential rapist. Every time.” The girls in the room nodded, agreeing. The boys seemed genuinely shocked. “So think about that the next time you hit on a girl. Maybe, like you in the taxi, she doesn’t actually want you to.”

Homophobia: The fear that another man will treat you like you treat women. Andrew Sullivan

(via neurotoxus)

I will never not reblog

(via stfueverything)

Touchdown.

(via mendmyheart)

(Source: andrewsullivan.thedailybeast.com, via starsandwords)

Reblogged from ohhcuppycakee-deactivated201109

It’s funny how it’s always the Muslim woman who is “oppressed”

It’s funny how it’s always the Muslim woman who is “oppressed”

(via starsandwords)